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11 Year Old Daughter Is Losing Hair Rapidly

Discussion in 'Women's General Hair Loss Discussions' started by MommaBear79, Jan 5, 2020.

  1. MommaBear79

    MommaBear79 New Member

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    Hi, I am new to this forum. Androgenetic alopecia runs in my family. It has affected my paternal grandmother, my sister, my niece, me and now my 11 year old daughter is showing signs of it, and it’s causing a lot of distress for me. The rest of us didn’t have symptoms of it until we were in our 20s, but my 11 year old has not even started menstruating yet and already her part is pretty wide. I’m attaching some pictures. I’m wondering if it’s really possible to show symptoms of androgenetic alopecia this early or if there is another reason she may be losing her hair. I recently took her to an endocrinologist. They found that her thyroid is elevated (hypothyroidism) but didn’t think this could cause hairloss and said it wasn’t severe enough to even treat. They want me to bring her back in 6 months for a follow-up. However, I keep reading online that this could be the cause and wondering if I should get a second opinion. I have an appointment with a dermatologist. What can I expect there? Can they perform some tests to give a more definitive diagnosis or should I just expect to be told to start her on rogaine without any testing? I also want to take her to an allergist to have her tested for a gluten sensitivity. My sister-in-law has celiac disease, which caused hairloss for her. Could this be the culprit! I am also considering having a test done for vitamin deficiency. I’m not sure if this test would be performed by a dermatologist or if I need to take her to a pediatrician. I read that an iron deficiency could cause hairloss. Any advice you can offer is greatly appreciated!
     

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  2. alomom

    alomom Member

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    Hello from one mother to another. You are doing all the right things. You always want to rule out any physical before going to the next step. If I were you, I would take my lead from what your daughter as to what she is seeing and feeling. I am hopeful it will not go further and you are an amazing mom. Many of the autoimmune diseases effect the hair. Please try not to make your daughter "crazy", I say this because I did as she was losing her hair and they can shut you out. I am sure you have heard about the National alopecia Areata Foundation, they are a very good resource for this condition. I wish you all the best, PS they can do a scalp biopsy and that can tell you about the hair follicle condition. That is how they confirmed alopecia Areata for our daughter.
     
  3. Grateful1828

    Grateful1828 New Member

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    Hello- I started losing my hair around the same age and wasn’t diagnosed through bloodwork for Hashimotos until I was 30 years old. I am now a certified health coach trying to help others. Here is some things I would suggest if I were you.
    1. Avoid Gluten- like all gluten- this will help stop the high level of antibodies the thyroid is producing .2. I wouldn’t bring her around to doctor to doctor because in my experience there is nothing they will do except put her on rogaine. I remember how depressing that time was for me never getting any answers- I feel most dr think it is a cosmetic thing and unless something is REALLY off in bloodwork they won’t do anything.
    3. I would get as much whole foods (fruits and veg) in her as possible. When I started my symptoms I was on a pretty much carb only (breads) diet which wasn’t serving me well.
    4. I honestly feel if you start focusing on healing her whole body early you can reverse this, I just found out the things I know too late. There is hope!!
    Feel free to message me privately I can recommend some books



    QUOTE="MommaBear79, post: 261267, member: 172523"]Hi, I am new to this forum. Androgenetic alopecia runs in my family. It has affected my paternal grandmother, my sister, my niece, me and now my 11 year old daughter is showing signs of it, and it’s causing a lot of distress for me. The rest of us didn’t have symptoms of it until we were in our 20s, but my 11 year old has not even started menstruating yet and already her part is pretty wide. I’m attaching some pictures. I’m wondering if it’s really possible to show symptoms of androgenetic alopecia this early or if there is another reason she may be losing her hair. I recently took her to an endocrinologist. They found that her thyroid is elevated (hypothyroidism) but didn’t think this could cause hairloss and said it wasn’t severe enough to even treat. They want me to bring her back in 6 months for a follow-up. However, I keep reading online that this could be the cause and wondering if I should get a second opinion. I have an appointment with a dermatologist. What can I expect there? Can they perform some tests to give a more definitive diagnosis or should I just expect to be told to start her on rogaine without any testing? I also want to take her to an allergist to have her tested for a gluten sensitivity. My sister-in-law has celiac disease, which caused hairloss for her. Could this be the culprit! I am also considering having a test done for vitamin deficiency. I’m not sure if this test would be performed by a dermatologist or if I need to take her to a pediatrician. I read that an iron deficiency could cause hairloss. Any advice you can offer is greatly appreciated![/QUOTE]
     
  4. stream26

    stream26 New Member

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    As I know the common cause of hair loss in teens is a condition called "alopecia areata". This happens when the body's immune cells attack hair follicles, leading to hair loss. Hair disappears in circles on the scalp. This condition usually gets better with time.
     
  5. Mayra Singh

    Mayra Singh New Member

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    Hello, I will say knowing the cause helps a lot. Alopecia areata is a common hair condition and there are many hair treatments available for it. Also it is caused due to abnormalities in the immune system, you should treat it as well.
     
  6. elixirhtc

    elixirhtc Member

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    humm you don't need to be worry too much about just get proper check up and consultation from an experience doctor...
     

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