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20 years old, not sure what this could be?

Discussion in 'The Undiagnosed' started by kitkat674, Nov 6, 2015.

  1. kitkat674

    kitkat674 New Member

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    Hi everyone! I'm new to this forum, I'm a 20 year woman and a little over 2 years ago I discovered a small smooth bald spot near my bang area, there is actually another smaller spot near the larger but there is a tiny bit of hair separating them. I know that it isn't significant hair loss but I guess it just gives me anxiety because I'm constantly worrying it will spread and progress. I can't go a day without checking this thing. I've done lots of research and I came across this form of cicatricial alopecia called Pseudopelade of Brocq, does anyone know anything about this condition? Or have any other possible causes? I'd appreciate any bit of information you have.

    Thank you all for your time and answers :)
     

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  2. labellavita1985

    labellavita1985 Experienced Member

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    First of all I just want to welcome you to the forum. You are in a good place. Hair loss is devastating and you have every right to be concerned about your patches, even though your hair loss may appear to be "insignifcant" to others (not suggesting by any means that I think it is. Hair loss is always a cause for concern in my opinion, especially in young females and especially when it is unrelated to Androgenetic Alopecia, or female pattern/male pattern baldness.)

    I know nothing about cicatricial alopecia, but I was just wondering if you have any reasons to think that what you are experiencing is cicatricial alopecia. Do you experience scalp pain? Cicatricial alopecia is much more rare as far as I know, and it looks like the kind you are referring to (Pseudopelade of Brocq) is extremely rare, compared to something like alopecia areata. Have you done any research into alopecia areata? In my opinion, whenever patchy hair loss is present, it usually brings to mind alopecia areata first.

    In any case, please get yourself to a dermatologist. They may want to do a biopsy, or they may just diagnose you by looking at your scalp (it is my understanding that alopecia areata doesn't always need a biopsy to be confirmed.) Please keep us updated.
     
  3. kitkat674

    kitkat674 New Member

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    Thank you for your response! You are very kind, I was a little worried about posting anything because I didn't want to seem like I was fussing about a small patch of hair loss when I know that there are other people with more visible hair loss.

    I have never been to the dermatologist before, only a primary care doctor (around 2 years ago, shortly after i noticed the patch) and had some blood work done to check my thyroid and vitamin levels, everything came back normal except a deficiency in vitamin D which I now take supplements for. Also, I did take an unrelated visit to the gynecologist back in March and while I was there I had my hormones checked because I have problems with an irregular cycle. I can't remember the specific names of these hormones, but they also came back normal.

    To answer your question though, I guess the reason I'm thinking it might be cicatricial alopecia is because from my understanding, doesn't alopecia areata progress at a relatively fast rate, over a span of months of loss and regrowth? The patches that I have are not nicely oval shaped like I've seen in Alopecia Areata and I haven't noticed any patches in other locations around my head or regrowth in the current patches. Cicatricial alopecia progresses slowly over the years which is why I thought it might be that.
     
  4. DisTressing

    DisTressing Established Member

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    I wanted to just pop in and say that two years of making yourself anxious over this is two years too
    many! Definitely get checked out by a dermatologist. Whatever it is, if it requires treatment you need to nab it right away to ensure the best outcome. Ask around to get recommendations to a good dr. who specializes in hair loss. Other dermatologists can sadly prove useless in these situations.
     
  5. kitkat674

    kitkat674 New Member

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    I definitely will try to get in to see one, its just hard because I live on my college campus without a car or anything so I'd have to try and get an appointment when I'm home. Thanks for the suggestion though, as soon as I find a reputable one I will make an appointment :)
     
  6. labellavita1985

    labellavita1985 Experienced Member

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    Kitkat, I agree with Distressing, I really think you should go see a dermatologist ASAP. I don't mean to scare you but cicatricial alopecia is permanent, there is nothing that can be done to reverse it, the only thing that may be possible is preventing further loss. So it's absolutely imperative that you see a dermatologist. And to answer your question, no I do not necessarily think that alopecia areata advances quickly. In the Wikipedia article that I read it said that some people will never experience more than one or two patches, and in those cases, dermatologists sometimes will just choose to monitor the patches and not treat them, especially if the person doesn't mind. And alopecia areata can cause hair loss that presents in many different ways, sometimes people will lose hair in the ophiasis pattern, which is complete loss around the periphery of the head, some people will have the opposite (sisaihpo) and lose hair in the crown of the head. In some people, alopecia areata is completely diffuse, with no patches to speak of.
     
  7. kitkat674

    kitkat674 New Member

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    Thank you both for your responses, I will definitely try to get into see the dermatologist as soon as possible. I guess the only thing that was holding me back from going was that I worry I will get a doctor that doesn't know what they are doing and gives me a misdiagnosis or something, but you are right it is better to see a professional than to do nothing. Thank you both for taking the time to help me out :) I'll post updates of what I find out once I go.
     
  8. DisTressing

    DisTressing Established Member

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    please definitely come back and post an update! Whenever you see a specialist to check out something that seems odd and that troubles you, especially if are concerned about what you're told, it would be a good idea to go for a second opinion afterwards. But let's just get the first step out of the way. Good luck!!!
     

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