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Anyone with experience on Thyroid and Hormone levels help me with this?

Discussion in 'The Undiagnosed' started by JenVoy, Oct 12, 2015.

  1. JenVoy

    JenVoy Established Member

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  2. sheeny

    sheeny Established Member

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    What are your questions? I know a little bit & many women on here are very knowledgable :)
     
  3. JenVoy

    JenVoy Established Member

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    Ugh I went in to copy and paste the info a few days ago and I forgot to paste it again! LOL. Forgive my memory loss...life with a 2 year old!
    I'll update it tomorrow!
     
  4. Eloise J. Lowe

    Eloise J. Lowe New Member

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    3 easy to find products for thinning hair in women

    Before you decide on a product to treat your thinning hair, first you need to determine the type problem you have. For example if you notice more of your scalp than you used to, or your partings appear wider then the conclusion would be that you have female pattern thinning. However, if you notice more hair in the wash and your hair seems less dense than it did then you could be suffering a shedding problem. The effectiveness of the product you use very much depends if it is suitable for the type of hair problem you have. So how can a woman determine the type of hair problem she has?
    The most common types of hair loss in women are:
    • Female pattern thinning- also know as Androgenic Alopecia
    • Telogen Effluvium -also known as Diffuse Alopecia
    • Alopecia Areata - also known as patchy hair loss
    The term Alopecia features in all these conditions, that's because Alopecia actually means `loss of hair'. Each type has an additional name to clarify it. It is important also then to understand that these conditions are different, have different causes and therefore need different regimes to treat them. This answers why some products do not work for some sufferers.
    To recognise the difference between the conditions the sufferer can obtain a diagnosis by consulting and seeking the advice of a professional. Alternatively looking at the variation in the different conditions may also be helpful as some of these conditions have characteristic signs that can guide you.
    Female pattern Thinning / Androgenic Alopecia - The most common type of hair loss referred to as thinning hair. This type of hair loss is termed as pattern thinning because the hair loss only affects the top region of the scalp, much like male pattern baldness but to a much lesser degree. Unlike the male version women tend to retain their frontal hairline and don't bald completely. This is a genetically inherited condition. Genetics gives the sufferer a predisposition to the condition and then its hormones that actually affect the hair growth. The genetics determines how the hair loss will progress.
    3 easy to find products:
    1. In the early stages of this hair loss growth stimulators have proved to be effective. The main product medically approved is Minoxidil. This treatment lotion can be purchased in 2% or 5% strengths. The brand name is Regaine or Rogaine. Manufacturer's instructions should be followed and results can take 6-12 months.
    2. Nutritional supplements to improve hair growth can be helpful in the very early stages. A multi vitamin specifically designed for optimum hair growth is the best choice.
    3. In more advanced stages hair replacement is probably a better option such as volumisers and wigs. Volumisers are attachments like wigs but smaller and can be attached to existing hair to add volume if a full wig is not yet necessary.
     
  5. JenVoy

    JenVoy Established Member

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    I've done a lot of research on hair loss. I am not using rogaine and unfortunately pills such as a multivitamin do not help once your in the middle of a TE. But thank you for the info. It would probably be very helpful for someone with little knowledge to hair loss.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Sheeny- Here is what I meant to post the other day and got side tracked...

    TSH 1.12
    T4 1.4
    T3 3.1
    T3 Reverse 22

    Estrodial 51
    Total Testosterone 29
    Free Testosterone 1.8

    These seem "normal" to me, but I was just told by someone that my testosterone was a bit too low? Should any other level be checked to rule out PCOS completely?
     
  6. sheeny

    sheeny Established Member

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    Hi JenVoy!
    Your TSH is right where it should be above 1 and below 2 is optimal. I believe that a lower T3 can be indicative of a slight hypothyroid, but yours is not low. The relationship between T3, T4, and RT3 is super confusing- so I'm not sure how to read those numbers. I do know that important thyroid tests to have done to rule out/diagnose any thyroid diseases like hashimotos & graves are your thyroid antibodies. It has been a while since I have done mine, but I believe there are 2 (possibly 3) antibody tests that can be done. I have nodules on my thyroid (so far unrelated to my hair loss) and found the website stopthethyroidmadness to be helpful.
    It is also helpful to know when in your cycle your estridol was done- it should go up and down at certain points. Do you know what day you had that serum done? Also, it is also good to have progesterone done at the same time so that you can see the ratio. However, estrogen & progesterone levels aren't used to diagnose PCOS. They are definitely related to hair loss, but usually only NP doctors are interested in them.
    Your free Testosterone is also at a good level. I forget the suggested cut off for Total T, but I think you are at a good range- certainly not too low. Your Free T would likely be higher if you had PCOS and weren't on meds like BCP or Spironolactone.
    To "rule out" PCOS, you may want to have your lh/FSH levels run (I think the best day is between days 3-7). If the ratio of LH/FSH comes back 2 or more, it can be indicative of PCOS. The higher the ratio, the higher the chances. It can also vary from month to month, mine has been 2, 1.5, and below 1 all in these last few months :/
    Also, have you had an ultrasound done of your ovaries and been tested for insulin resistance?
    PCOS is "diagnosed" differently by different doctors, and it is often misdiagnosed (told you have it when you don't). I think that the general consensus is that if you meet 3/4 of the criteria to diagnose, then you are assumed to have it. Unfortunately, there really is no "cure" besides treating the symptoms & treatment is very limited. I never thought I had it since I had no trouble conceiving (and many of my friends in their 30s with pcos did), but it turns out either I got lucky or PCOS developed its symptoms after I had children.
    I hope I was of some help!
     
  7. JenVoy

    JenVoy Established Member

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    Thank you Sheeny! No ultrasound. My obgyn didn't think I needed it (which was irritating). I have cysts on my ovaries, I didn't get my period for a month (but I'm assuming it was due to the trazodone I was on that made my hair fall out, along with stress when it started). I've always been consistent with my period.

    I am tempted to schedule an appointment with an endocrinologist instead of going back to the gyno. No clue if I should wait another 3 months to see if the shedding slows down and leave it alone, or just go and assume it's something else. I also have low ferritin, so....UGH!
     
  8. Wolf924

    Wolf924 Experienced Member

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    I would really look more into this, as this sounds not like trazodone but a hormonal imbalance. I would also push for the ultrasound--I had one too just to rule out PCOS.
     
  9. JenVoy

    JenVoy Established Member

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    I think that an ultrasound would be the last thing I check, if the hair loss doesn't stop in 3 more months. My hormone levels checked out okay.

    I find it hard to believe that it's hormones considering I've never had this issue before...even after having my son 2.5 years ago. My post partum hair loss was normal and my hair came back in thicker than it was before. I would imagine if it were hormonal I'd have had substantial hair loss after having my son, and even prior to that while I was pregnant..or at least had any other hormone related issue. But who knows!:confused:
     

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