Dismiss Notice
Welcome! Please read this announcement regarding the new Forums: Click Here"

Curis (hedgehog signaling)

Discussion in 'New Research, Studies, and Discoveries' started by Tricia, Jul 11, 2005.

  1. Tricia

    Tricia Guest

    Curis Presents Study Showing Stimulation of Hair Growth by Small Molecule Hedgehog Pathway Agonist
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Feb. 22, 2005-- Report wins first prize among poster presentations at annual meeting of American Academy of Dermatology

    Curis, Inc. (NASDAQ: CRIS), a therapeutic drug development company, today announced that Curis scientists have demonstrated that a small molecule drug compound can induce hair growth in a preclinical model. The data were presented February 19 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology that is being held in New Orleans from February 18-22. The report, which was presented by senior author Dr. Rudy Paladini, was awarded the first prize among poster presentations at the meeting.

    The drug compound in the study is a small molecule agonist of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. In the skin, Hedgehog signaling is required for hair follicle morphogenesis during development and for regulating hair follicle growth and cycling in the adult.

    In the current study, the small molecule Hedgehog agonist, when topically formulated and applied to the skin, was able to transition the hair follicles from the resting phase of the hair cycle to the growth phase, resulting in pronounced stimulation of hair growth. The authors of the study conclude that the topical application of a Hedgehog agonist may be effective in treating hair disorders, such as male pattern baldness and female pattern hair loss.

    Daniel Passeri, President and Chief Executive Officer of Curis, said, "We are very pleased with these results and with the progress that has been made in our hair growth program. We are also evaluating the requirements for clinical development in hair growth indications in order to decide on an appropriate strategy for moving this program forward."

    The Hedgehog agonist program was exclusively licensed to Wyeth Pharmaceuticals in February 2004. Under the terms of the license agreement, Curis retained the right to develop Hedgehog agonists for topical treatment to stimulate hair growth. The terms of the agreement include Wyeth's right to approve any compounds that Curis will ultimately develop in this area. In December 2004, Wyeth approved the reversion of a group of Hedgehog agonist compounds for use in our hair program.
     
  2. Tricia

    Tricia Guest

    Sept 1 press release. not much different

    September 01, 2005 09:00 AM US Eastern Timezone

    Hedgehog Agonists Modulate Hair Growth; Preclinical Data Published in The Journal of Investigational Dermatology

    BIOWIRE2K

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sept. 1, 2005--Curis, Inc. (NASDAQ: CRIS), a therapeutic drug development company, today announced the publication of data reporting on the therapeutic efficacy of one of Curis' proprietary Hedgehog pathway activators in an adult animal model of hair growth. The results of the study show that a topically applied small molecule agonist of the Hedgehog signaling pathway can stimulate the transition of hair follicles from the resting to the growth stage of the hair cycle. The Hedgehog agonist induces hair growth and causes no other detectable short or long-term changes in the skin of the animals. This study also demonstrated that the Hedgehog agonist is active in human scalp in vitro as measured by Hedgehog pathway gene expression. The results suggest that topical application of a Hedgehog agonist could be effective in treating hair loss conditions, including male and female pattern hair loss. These results expand on those that were presented at the February 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.


    Curis' Hedgehog agonist program was exclusively licensed to Wyeth Pharmaceuticals in January of 2004. Under the terms of the license agreement, Curis retained the right to develop Hedgehog agonists for topical treatment to stimulate hair growth. The license agreement was subsequently amended to broaden Curis' development rights to include topical applications to treat or prevent skin diseases or disorders and Wyeth has approved a group of Hedgehog agonist compounds for use in Curis' retained programs.

    "We are encouraged by these preclinical results showing the utility of Hedgehog agonists to stimulate hair growth in an adult animal model. It is our goal to partner this program with another biotechnology company or a larger pharmaceutical company with expertise and skills in dermatological hair growth that complement our own in-house capabilities. Our collaboration strategy allows for the development of a broad portfolio of promising assets providing risk diversification with significant value potential," said Daniel R. Passeri, President and Chief Executive Officer of Curis, Inc.

    The article entitled, "Modulation of hair growth with small molecule agonists of the hedgehog signaling pathway" will appear in the October issue of The Journal of Investigational Dermatology. An online version of the article is available now at http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/jid/0/0. Authors of the paper include Rudolph D. Paladini, Jacqueline Saleh, Changgeng Qian, Guang-Xin Xu, and Lee L. Rubin, all of Curis, Inc.
     
  3. teester

    teester Guest

    Wow!
    The Hedgehog....my new favorite animal!
     
  4. Tricia

    Tricia Guest

    Procter & Gamble joins the hedgehog fan club.

     
  5. Karen

    Karen Guest

    Geez - can you translate in English in 10 words or less?


    Karen
     
  6. Tricia

    Tricia Guest

    That's funny Karen. I just now saw this post. Here's the translation for you in 10 words:

    Curis has a drug that grows hair. P&G is paying.
     
  7. Karen

    Karen Guest

    Tricia,

    Want to go to Cambridge, Mass. with me?
     
  8. Tricia

    Tricia Guest

    I did hear something kind of bad about the hedgehog. In early clinical tests for neurological disorders, it grew thick hair all over one participant...a young male. He kind of liked the thick sideburns which persisted long after the trial. I don't know of too many women who would like that side effect :lol: . But, they injected the guy with the drug. For the hair program, I'm guessing it would be a topical....but still fear the hairy side effects.
     
  9. wukkel

    wukkel Guest

    Do you know when they think it'll be available world - wide ? (can you imagine asking 'one hedgehog please' :lol: ) I'd be willing to try anything to help my hair grow back. And who knows should those side burns grow we could all make millions by becoming elvis impersonators :wink:

    wukkel
     
  10. Lily

    Lily Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    2,763
    Likes Received:
    11
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I have come to the conclusion that the only hope for me is something like this, hair multiplication, etc. I've tried almost everything, prescription and over-the-counter with no success. They can't perfect it soon enough!!!
     
  11. Tricia

    Tricia Guest

    I have to agree with Lily, but for different reasons. I think we're closer to having hair multiplication than any of the drugs that are in the works. The Curis drug is interesting, but they haven't even started FDA trials yet. At least one company (Intercytex) has completed Phase I trials for hair multiplication. And another company (Aderans) is about to start FDA trials soon for HM.

    There was another drug in the works that finished Phase II trials (OSH101), but that seems to have completely fallen off the map. I haven't heard any more about that drug.
     

Share This Page