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Hair Transplants for Women

Discussion in 'Hair Transplants for Women' started by sal, May 9, 2007.

  1. sal

    sal Guest

    Anybody know (or care to speculate) as to why there are so few women who post who have had hair transplants? Those who do post seem to pretty much disappear from the boards after one or two posts. Does this suggest anything about results achieved?

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. devastated

    devastated Guest

    Yes, I'd also like to hear of more experiences with hair transplants. I may go that route someday and it makes me wonder why there aren't more posts here about it. Considering the cost of a really good wig or two, transplants are not that bad money wise. Also, I don't know if I could handle seeing myself without the wig or having my husband see me at night without it. This whole thing is a nightmare. I have other things going on emotionally and physically and finding the hair thinning, having been told it was Androgenetic Alopecia (the worst kind) , nothing working so far , was just the icing on my poisoned cake. D
     
  3. sal

    sal Guest

    Thanks for the reply Devastated.

    I think more women would feel encouraged to go the hair transplant route if there was more information out there from patients. The fact that there isn't seems to suggest that either not many hair transplant patients are women and/or those that do try it are disappointed.

    The hair transplant forums for men have many, many men posting detailed experiences & pics which makes researching & making an informed choice for men much easier ie. procedure, what to expect, best doctors etc. etc.

    Until the same info is available to women the whole area remains a minefield!
     
  4. sal

    sal Guest

    Lots of views I notice, but no responses from ladies pleased with their hair transplant experience. Does this answer the question I wonder..
     
  5. help me

    help me Guest

    From what I have read, the problem with hair transplants on women is that with diffuse thinning, there is really no good "donor" area. Men might go completely bald up top, but there head is progammed to keep the hair on the sides and back. HR Specialists can take hair from the back of a man's head and tranplant up top and in the front. The donor hair will then grow. Most women with Androgenetic Alopecia are not that lucky.
     
  6. wall

    wall Guest

    Yr. out

    I am a year post op from a hair transplant. It is a long, slow, often frustrating process; however, I am happy that I decieded to go through with the proceedure. I think before you go forward with the decision to have a hair transplant it is important to really explore what your expectations. I knew that I would not have the hair that I did when I was 17 yrs old; however, I did not consider the range that I would be acceptable - worth it.

    I have posted about my experience, but I would be happy to answer any other questions you might have....

    also, the doctor that I used has a pretty informative website... including pictures of actual women going through the proceedure. Even if you decide to go with another doctor, his videos can provide you with a better idea of the proceedure - and could prompt questions that you did not even think about - which can help when (if) you meet with a hair transplant doctor.

    here is website:http://www.lamfacialplastics.com/ho...loss--lam-institute-for-hair-restoration.html

    again, feel free to ask any ?'s
     
  7. Deirdre

    Deirdre Senior Member

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    I would be interested also in finding out what the outcomes are like. I don't seem to be losing hair from my neck area, at least so far, so maybe that would be a good donor site.
     
  8. Lily

    Lily Senior Member

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    I saw a surgeon re: a transplant. He was very up front about what my expectations should be. He said I'm wasn't the best candidate nor the worst. I don't think my donor area is all that hot--I have a "bob" sort of hair cut and the hair at my neck area is shorter so it's easy to tell when that sheds. Hair transplant is quite expensive too. And no guarantee that the transplanted follicle won't itself fade away some day.
     
  9. wall

    wall Guest

  10. angel706

    angel706 Guest

    I had a hair transplant almost a year and a half ago. About 1500 follicular units transplanted into my temple areas, which had receded when I was a teenager (I'm not in my late 30s). The rest of my hair was still quite thick. Because I had more of a male-type pattern, rather than the typical female diffuse-thinning pattern, I was considered a good candidate for the surgery.

    I was happy with my choice of surgeon. I think everything that was planted grew, and I will tell you it has made a cosmetic difference to me. It HAS helped. However, I still am not 100% happy with my hair. I think a lot of this has to do with the high expectations women place on their hair in general in terms of acceptable density...this extends to hair transplants.

    Consider that in a "normal" scalp, there are about 100-120 hairs per cm2. It's only when you lose about half that density (down to 50-60cm2) that thinning becomes noticeable. So if a surgeon can transplant 50 or more FUs per cm2 in your transplanted area, you will probably get a result that will be pretty satisfactory to you. However, not all transplant surgeons are able to achieve that high of density with one pass. Personally, I think I received closer to 30-35 FUs per cm2.

    It all comes down to supply and demand. The average head has about 7,000 FUs available for transfer in their donor area. And women may not be good candidates because if they are thinning in their donor areas as well, there is no "safe zone" from which to harvest hairs. You could move those hairs, only to lose them later anyway. Women also tend to suffer more shock loss of native hairs in the transplanted areas than do men. If the shocked-out hairs are healthy and strong, they will return after a few months, but if they were miniaturized and fated to fall out within a few hair growth cycles anyway, they will not return.

    So in general, women with diffuse thinning are often not as good of candidates for transplants as are men. I think even for women like me who are considered "good candidates," we often are disappointed with the results from one pass because we have higher standards for acceptable density then do men.
     
  11. Lily

    Lily Senior Member

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    You are so right--the different types of female hair loss make such a difference. Glad the transplant worked for you.
     
  12. Deirdre

    Deirdre Senior Member

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    Thanks Angel for the information which was really helpful.

    I thought I had read that the hair on our heads is "programmed" differently and that the hair on top is susceptible to falling out but not the other areas. I guess that would be in classic pattern Androgenetic Alopecia, maybe. So I guess maybe it does depend on what type loss one has as to whether it is likely to work. I would HATE to spend that much money only to have it fall out.
     

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