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Has anyone with persistent scalp pain gotten rid of it?

Discussion in 'Women's General Hair Loss Discussions' started by BGS92, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. Tori

    Tori Experienced Member

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    Inflammation is due to what you put in your body. I'm sure we've all heard the expression "you are what you eat". I haven't had scalp pain since I stopped eating pretty much anything from a grocery store. Have you all heard of "stomach share"? That's why everyone is sick with one thing or another. Even people who think they are eating healthy might as well be scarfing down junk food.. some "health foods" are even worse. If I were you I would consider an elimination diet. I know everyone just wants a quick fix or at least a sure fire answer.. but it's worth it. At the very least, know what's on your fork. If you don't recognize an ingredient, your body sure doesn't. How do you think it's going to react to things it doesn't recognize as foods? What about all those pesticides etc. Think about it..
     
  2. BGS92

    BGS92 Guest

    Thanks for the info girls :)
     
  3. DonnaL

    DonnaL Established Member

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    Diet was one of the first places I started when I was desperate for answers. I thoroughly researched a number of diet-approaches to try to eliminate whatever inflammation could be going on inside my body and I do believe in the benefits of a healthy "gut."

    Unfortunately for me, these restrictive diets had no effect on my burning scalp. I've read up on others who have tried the same to even greater extents with no change in scalp pain. I'm not saying it wasn't the healthiest thing I've probably ever done for my body, but it had no effect on my hair or scalp. Likewise I've since been more relaxed in the strictness of my diet and I'm currently on a bit of a "burn vacation"... very little pain, and no pain at all on most days right now. There's no explanation for the change that I can think of (except perhaps that I have far less hair and perhaps less live follicles). Still, my hair is falling at an unreal rate of around 400/day. My point being, I think of course everyone in the world would benefit from eating better, but I don't think our hair loss issues are quite that simple... Perhaps for some people there is a dietary trigger, but hair loss is a very complex and individualized problem and there is no cure-all that will work for everyone. If hormones are the problem, I doubt any eating plan in the world will change the rate of hair fall or scalp sensitivity. I do however think it's worth a try for anyone looking for natural options. I've thought of trying it again myself but I worry about my body not getting adequate nutrition as I'm actively trying to conceive. Catering your menu to restrictive diets can become a full-time job and involves a fair amount of research and planning. And then of course you have to consider you're not just cooking for yourself, but dragging your husband and kids if you have them into your new diet... husbands especially may not take it well lol.
     
  4. Tori

    Tori Experienced Member

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    I agree. For me, it was the best choice, because whether or not it helped, food does cause almost everything wrong with us (every little aspect relies on it.. hormones and all). It does take a lot of planning, but planning has no side effects ;). I'm not saying it's for everyone and I don't think food will reverse hair loss, don't get me wrong. But I do believe it has a big part in why it happens.. maybe THE part for many many women (lets not forget we aren't all losing our hair for the same reason and not everyone will benefit from the same methods to combat so of course you know women who didn't cure their hair loss from eating right.. but again, I was talking about inflammation, not curing hair loss) and I'd bet my last cent many here eat foods that are terrible for them on a regular basis, even if they think they're eating well. Most people eat from a grocery store, it wouldn't surprise me in the least considering they're behind so very many illnesses. Just food for thought.

    PS: It's not a diet, it's eating actual foods. I don't consider cutting out fake food and pesticides etc restrictive. I'm very against "diets". (elimination diets are just until the culprit is found, but I don't think they're necessary for the most part, just cut out fake foods).
    Dragging my family into it is the wrong way to look at it. It's something we did for them, not to them. Humans are very adaptable. Change can take time, but my kids love the way we eat and I'd rather take the time for change than continue to feed their poor bodies and brains with all that garbage on the shelves. I highly doubt most people in here would take one of those unknown ingredients or even a pesticide and down it with their breakfast, but if they can't see it, it's fine. I find it hard to believe it has nothing to do with hair loss in many cases. I'm amazed we're still alive to be honest lol.

    Just another perspective (and one that worked for me). Lotsa luck ladies :)
     
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  5. DonnaL

    DonnaL Established Member

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    I know what you mean hun- I meant to use "diet" loosely just meaning what we eat, although for me it was a little restricting because of course I was abstaining from foods I desired. I subscribe to the Dr. Mercola newletter and get their email daily... the nasty ingredients found in everyday foods is enough to make your head spin. Informative, but after reading each one you can't help but go "OH MY GOD MY FOOD IS KILLING ME" lol. You're absolutely right that it's amazing we all are surviving on the nonsense they stick in prepared foods. Convenience products definitely can come in handy though. I wish there were enough hours in my day for me to make my own condiments every time I have a salad or sandwich and I wish my wallet was big enough that I could buy organic everything... I do what I can and that's all I can do. There's a farm down the road from us with grass fed cattle that I frequent and our eggs come from my friend's farm. I have a batch of homemade sauerkraut fermenting as we speak... of course I won't get to eat it until October lol :) I look forward to the day when our property is excavated and I can at least have a garden again. Even a little bit of change to natural is better than nothing I think.
     
  6. Tori

    Tori Experienced Member

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    You're right, we can only do the best we can. Even many organics are getting runoff pesticides from other farmers or are using things we don't consider that we still wouldn't eat. But when it comes to convenience and cost.. in MY case.. I was spending more trying to get my hair back AND in retrospect, I'm spending far less on food now than I was. Convenience? I understand the quick fixes will always be way more appealing.. we want our hair back NOW, we want inflammation gone NOW.. but it doesn't work that way. I fear that if the answer comes (and maybe it has) people won't jump on board because it's too much work. I think being healthy, especially when how we eat aids in pretty much all illnesses, is far from inconvenient. Inconvenient is the day we wish we could go back and do differently. That's one day I won't see because of my eating now and I got rid of all inflammation to boot(including scalp and skin issues I've mentioned here in the past) among so much more. Not inconvenient at all lol. But I understand where you're coming from :)
     

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