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Iron Profile

Discussion in 'The Undiagnosed' started by Lizziemac, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. Deirdre

    Deirdre Senior Member

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    The ovaries and adrenals and pituitary all produce hormones as does the placenta when you are pregnant. The ovaries produce less and less as we age- they get worn out. The uterus is just kind of a holding area, so to speak.

    I have never heard of having 6 fallopian tubes. That sounds very strange. Two uteri but not not 3!
     
  2. angieangie

    angieangie Guest

    She had problems with it when she was younger... more menstrual cramps and bleeding, and sometimes periods twice a months. But she's on meds for it now. Apparently it's considered a gift because it's easier to get pregnant and also, many women with more than 2 falopian tubes have twins and triplets!
     
  3. Lizziemac

    Lizziemac Member

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    Well, here I am again, having been referred to a consultant gastroenterologist. After having blood tests and a ultrasound scan of my internal organs he has just yesterday diagnosed hemochromotosis which means that I have a rogue gene which prevents my body from eliminating iron. The treatment is venesection (taking blood) but this hasn't started yet. I'll be having 1 pint of blood removed every two weeks until my ferritin levels come down to normal, then less frequently for the rest of my life.

    This genetic disease can have very serious consequences if left undiagnosed. I never thought I'd say this, but thank God for my hair loss! If it hadn't been for that I wouldn't have gone to the doctor and this disease wouldn't have been discovered until it started showing symptoms, which include liver cancer. You never know, perhaps the ferritin levels being lowered will improve my hair. Wouldn't that be wonderful?

    Thanks everyone who has posted in reply to me. It's great to have people who understand.

    Lizzie
     
  4. angieangie

    angieangie Guest

    You should give blood. Apparently having too much iron is considered "the disease that helps others" or something like that, because a lot of doctors recommend you give blood as much as needed to keep your iron levels at a normal level.
     
  5. Lizziemac

    Lizziemac Member

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    Angie, I'm already blood donor, and now that I've been diagnosed with this disease I'll be put on the Blood Donatation Service's "hemochromotosis list" once my ferritin levels normalise, which means that they will incorporate my donations into my treatment.
     
  6. mythreeboys

    mythreeboys Guest

    Hi Lizzie,

    Wow I am so glad you did have a reason to see your doctor so that you found out now you have this. I am so sorry your going through this but it sounds like it can be managed right? My thoughts are with you.

    They thought my husband had polycythemia where you have to many red blood cells, one of the treatment plans was to donate blood but he ended up not having it.

    Keep us posted Lizzie on the hair - fingers crossed that the high iron was some of the cause. I hope you feel better too
     
  7. Lizziemac

    Lizziemac Member

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    Thanks, Mythreeboys. Yes, it appears to be quite easily managed if diagnosed early thank goodness. It would be an enormous bonus if it helped my thinning hair, but it does put it into perspective.
     

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