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needlestick at work

Discussion in 'Medications that can cause Hair Loss' started by rayneStormRN, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. rayneStormRN

    rayneStormRN Guest

    well, one risk as a nurse is sticking yourself with a dirty needle. and don't ya know it, got careless at work today, injected a patient with heparin, and managed to stick myself with same needle after. oh joy. i'm not concerned about it, gotta have all the blood work done, etc, but it was a low risk patient, and the heparin needle was just in their fat tissue, only blood drawn was mine when i stabbed my thumb with it.

    anyhow, i'm rambling, what does this have to do with meds and hair loss.

    well, naturally the doctor at work wants me to go on the anti retrovirus meds (anti hiv) as a precaution for the needle stick. NOW if this had been a high risk patient, such as needle marks up and down the arms, a person who engaged in high risk activities, my decision would have been different on taking the meds. i refused them, and of course doctor persisted in trying to talk me into it. i was of THREE thoughts on this.

    1. low risk patient, and even if it was a high risk patient, or even a known HIV positive patient, risk of transmission with a needle stick is MINISCULE, most likely not going to happen (i'm at more risk of hepatitis). ((altho if it had been a high risk patient i MIGHT have agreed to the meds, and if it had been HIV positive patient i would DEFINITELY have gone on the meds)

    2. my hair is growing back, i'll be DAMNED if i'm going on a medication that can make it fall back out when there isn't a GOOD reason to.

    3. side effects of the medications can be so severe that they have to prescribe a SECOND medication to help with them.

    of course the doctor was able to make me have second, and third thoughts, but i stuck to my guns and refused the meds. of course when i go to employee health on monday, they're going to try to talk me into it all over again.
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    why take a risk?
    if your hair is growing back, it will grow back later anyway.
    it is up to you, but i would follow the medical advice on something like that.
    my health is more important to me than hair. it isn't even close on that.
     
  3. rayneStormRN

    rayneStormRN Guest

    the hair was one of three reasons not to take it. the risk of anything happening is NEGLIGIBLE. again, if it had been a high risk patient, or even hiv positive patient, my decision would have been different. chance of transmission with a needle stick from a hiv + patient is .01. if the risk was there, AND If the meds had proof that would would prevent transmission if transmission was going to happen, that would also be a different thing. i do agree that health is more important than hair, BUT when there is no good REASON to take a medication, that's something else entirely.
     
  4. Deirdre

    Deirdre Senior Member

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    Did they not test the patient? When I got stuck a couple years ago trying to get a used needle into the full sharps container that of course the PCA had not changed out. They did lab work and she was negative. Another hospital did the same thing when I had my previous stick giving an IV push to a jerking kid. It does sound very unlikely giving a subQ that there would be any blood contact.
     
  5. rayneStormRN

    rayneStormRN Guest

    New York law says that the patient is the only one that can give consent for an HIV test, even after a needle stick UNLESS there is a legally designated health care proxy, in this case there isn't. at the time the patient was intubated, very severely brain injured, and the family has since withdrawn care. there are no exceptions to this, even when the patient is dying and will never be able to give consent.

    they tested her for hepatitis of course.

    granted, hair was a MINOR consideration in not taking the meds, i based the decision MOSTLY on the risk i considered the patient, SECONDLY on the side effects of the meds (which make you very very sick), and a small third on the hair.
     
  6. Deirdre

    Deirdre Senior Member

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    That is totally ridiculous! There need to be some nurses on the NY legislature!
     

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